An extract of the Chinese herbal root kudzu reduces alcohol drinking by heavy drinkers in a naturalistic setting

kudzu extract and alcohol addiction

Supporting evidence by Keung et al. (1995) has shown that the ability of structural analogs of daidzin to increase 5-HIAL accumulation is positively correlated with the compound’s alcohol-suppressing capabilities. The significance and application of this finding to other isoflavone compounds (e.g., puerarin) and to the human mitochondrial pathway system remains unknown. This randomized between-subject, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 2 weeks of baseline, 4 weeks of treatment, and 2 weeks of follow-up.

  • The extract contained 26% (130 mg) active isoflavones (20% puerarin, 4% daidzin, 2% daidzein; an improved HPLC analysis revealed that the total puerarin content includes both puerarin and 3-methoxypuerarin.).
  • Keung (2002) lists several known effects of daidzin and speculates how these may act to reduce alcohol consumption.
  • However, these studies were conducted on lone individuals drinking within highly controlled laboratory conditions.
  • The concept that a more rapid delivery of alcohol to the brain would result in a decrease (and not an increase) in drinking behavior seems counter intuitive.
  • “It is also possible that there is another, as yet undiscovered compound in the mixture that accounts for the effects. Thus, the mechanism of action of the kudzu extract remains unknown.”
  • The amount of alcohol consumed was calculated for each group (1 unit per drink of beer or spirits, 1.6 units per glass of wine).
  • Of course, it is entirely possible that any of the above mechanisms may also develop with repeated administration and complement the immediate altered absorption effect that likely explains kudzu’s rapid onset of action.

Economic costs of excessive alcohol consumption in the U.S. 2006

Studies on the effectiveness of kudzu for alcoholism have shown mixed results. While some studies have shown promising results, others have found no significant difference between kudzu and a placebo. It is important to note that kudzu should not be used as a substitute for professional medical treatment for alcoholism. Kudzu root is available in lots of forms including capsules, liquid extracts, and powder. There’s not a recommended dosage for kudzu root, but there have been human studies that can help guide you. One study in mice found that kudzu vine extract was highly beneficial in treating alcohol-induced liver damage by scavenging harmful free radicals and boosting the natural antioxidant system (6).

Will kudzu supplement pills make me drink less alcohol?

kudzu extract and alcohol addiction

The drinks were administered between 2 and 2.5 hours after consumption of the morning dose of medication as blood levels of puerarin peak at this time (Penetar et al., 2006). Participants continued to take their medication through the morning of day 9 prior to the alcohol drink challenge. Following the first set of challenge sessions, there was a 1 month ‘washout’ period during which no medication was taken. This washout period provided ample time to eliminate pharmacodynamic interactions between kudzu and placebo treatment conditions. After the one-month washout, a second period of treatment and two drinking challenge days was conducted identical to the first treatment period. An analysis of the participant’s alcohol craving or urge to drink prior to the drinking session revealed that neither was affected by kudzu pretreatment.

kudzu extract and alcohol addiction

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Young stems are hairy, and the leaves are trifoliate and also hairy (Fig. 13-10A). It produces pretty reddish purple pea-like flowers that kudzu to stop drinking lead to the production of dark brown hairy pods. Dry Mouth Dry mouth, also known as xerostomia, can occur as a side effect of kudzu use.

We previously demonstrated that short-term treatment with a standardized kudzu extract (NPI-031) reduced alcohol drinking by men and women in a natural setting. The present study was conducted in nontreatment-seeking heavy drinkers to assess the safety and efficacy of 4 weeks of kudzu extract in an outpatient setting. Drinking was recorded using a custom built end table that contained https://ecosoberhouse.com/article/10-major-physical-signs-of-alcoholism-to-watch-out-for/ a digital scale beneath a ceramic tile insert in the tabletop (Ohaus model #B10P with I5S controller). Participants were instructed to always keep the beer glass on the table except when taking a sip. The scale was connected to a computer in an adjacent room that ran a customized program that sampled the scale at 5 Hz and detected any weight changes that exceeded 1 gm.

kudzu extract and alcohol addiction

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  • The researchers observed 12 men and women in a double-blind placebo-controlled study.
  • The resultant call for adopting a zero tolerance policy for alcohol-impaired driving3 has necessitated seeking effective treatment strategies for patients with alcoholism.
  • My standards for categorizing an herb or drug as a “miracle” supplement are quite high.
  • I recall feeling a very slight prickly feeling in my skin after I’d had a few drinks, and a mild head rush.
  • The mixture was poured into 3 equal volume cups and placed on ice until administration.

May help treat liver damage

  • This time, the groups were given the opposite pill from the one they’d previously taken (meaning that they acted as their own control for the experiment).
  • Furthermore, kudzu root has demonstrated potential benefits for heart health, diabetes management, antioxidant protection, and alleviating menopausal symptoms.
  • According to some studies, kudzu root may help manage some symptoms of metabolic syndrome.
  • The leaves of this plant were smoked by Russian soldiers during World War II when there was a shortage of tobacco.

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